[vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1486487090279{padding-top: 30px !important;padding-bottom: 10px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_bis_section_title title=”Leconfield Lectures”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1486488264514{padding-bottom: 10px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”528″ img_size=”medium” alignment=”center”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

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[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1486487692822{padding-top: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_column_text]The Leconfield Lecture is named after the first Chairman of the British-Italian Society. Hugh Wyndham, who was Chairman for 12 years in the 1940s and 1950s, became Lord Leconfield in 1952. After Lord Leconfield’s death in 1963, Sir Ashley Clarke, then chairman of the Society, inaugurated this series of annual lectures in his honour. Ever since, the Leconfield Lecture has been the main event in the Society’s annual calendar, and has always been given by a speaker of particular distinction.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2019″ title=”Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi: Two Italian Artists at the Court of King Charles I” author=”Dr Gabriele Finaldi”][vc_bis_lectures date=”2018″ title=”Edgar Degas and Italy” author=”Dr Denis V Reidy”][vc_bis_lectures date=”2017″ title=”The Two Eyes of Europe: Byzantium and Italy” author=”Lord True”][/vc_column][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2016″ title=”The Beginnings of Global Opera” author=”Dr Benjamin Walton”][/vc_column][vc_column][/vc_column][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2015″ title=”The Ceramic Museum of Casteldilago” author=”Sir Timothy Clifford”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2014″ title=”Becoming a Musician in Renaissance Italy – or Not…” author=”Dr Bonnie Blackburn”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2013″ title=”The State of Italy” author=”Mr Bill Emmott”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2012″ title=”Travelling Texts, Eastern Approaches: Italian Fabulists and the 1001 Nights” author=”Dame Marina Warner”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2011″ title=”Italo Calvino” author=”Prof Martin McLaughlin”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2010″ title=”Caravaggio: A Life Sacred and Profane” author=”Dr Andrew Graham-Dixon”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2009″ title=”Hadrian, the Eternal Emperor” author=”Dr Paul Roberts”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2008″ title=”Women in Power: Caterina and Maria De Medici and the Artemisia Tapestries” author=”Dr James Bradburne”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2007″ title=”The Giuseppe Garibaldi Bicentenary” author=”Ms Anita Garibaldi & Prof Daniel Pick”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2006″ title=”Puccini’s Heroines” author=”Sir Antonio Pappano”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2005″ title=”Mazzini: Prophet of the Nation” author=”Prof Christopher Duggan”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2004″ title=”Melo and Drama: The Films of Luchino Visconti and the Music of Nino Rota” author=”Dr Richard Dyer”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2003″ title=”Herculaneum” author=”Prof Andrew Walace-Hadrill”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1486487504486{padding-bottom: 30px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_bis_lectures date=”2002″ title=”Justice Italian Style” author=”Mr David Willey”][/vc_column][/vc_row]